Author Interview – Joy Lynn Goddard

I am pleased to have Author Joy Lynn Goddard as my guest this week.

Joy is an accomplished writer in the young adult genre though more recently, she has collaborated with her husband, Dan, on adult fiction.

Thank you, Joy, for participating in my interview.

About Writing/Books/Being an Author

1.Do you remember the first book you read that had an impact on you – in what way and what was the name of that book?

Although I’m an avid reader now, I wasn’t much of a reader as a young child. I rarely picked up a book! My teachers and parents were always telling me to read something and that annoyed me, so I refused. However, I also preferred running around and having adventures to curling up with a book. I was more likely to build a fort and pretend I was being held captive there by an evil witch than read about a similar adventure in a book. That said, I remember my Grade 8 teacher reading Moonfleet by J. Meade Falkner to the class, and I loved the book. It was dark, scary, exciting.

2.Who is/are your favourite author(s)?

Harper Lee, Stephen King, Jodi Picoult, Linwood Barclay, Alice Munro, Gillian Flynn

3.What is your favourite thing about writing? What is your least favourite thing about writing?

Writing is like having a movie playing in my head. It’s very entertaining. I love movies! What I don’t like about writing is that after I’ve edited my manuscript for the umpteenth time, I have trouble letting it go. Enough, already!

4.Where do your ideas come from?

I can find ideas from almost every waking moment—from strangers or people in my life or from the places I’ve been, including an ordinary trip to the bank or grocery store as much as an exotic locale. I get ideas from the Internet, newspapers, books, journals and magazines and then combine and stretch these ideas, changing them to make them my own. When teaching, I got ideas from ordinary kids and situations in the classroom and schoolyard.

5.When you create characters, are they completely made up or do they resemble or remind you of people you know?

I often create characters from my imagination, but I also develop characters by combining the traits of people I know personally or from the media.

6.What are you working on now and can you tell us about it?

My husband and I are working on a novel about a contest to sell an old Inn in vineyard where a murder has taken place.

7.Have you won any awards for your writing/books and if so what?

My first YA novel, Daredevils (along with its teacher manual by Ruthanne Finnigan) won the Ontario English Catholic Teacher Association (OECTA) provincial Best Practice Award in 2005. Additionally, in recognition for our contribution to literacy, which involved my Northview Tales series–Daredevils, Hello, my name is Emily, Charlie’s Song–we received the OECTA AWARD of Merit in 2009. The books are read in schools in Ontario, BC and Alberta.

A Little More Personal

8.Can you tell us about an embarrassing/funny moment?

I can think of an embarrassing/ funny moment that happened when my husband and I were in a noisy coffee shop once. We were discussing the plot of a story for our anthology Buyers, Liars, Sellers and Yellers –in particular, how to kill off one of the characters—when the room fell silent. Everybody near our table was staring at us, some clearly disgusted. With the waiter’s help, we were able to explain that we had been plotting fiction, not fact, and everybody had a good laugh.

9.Do you have a favourite vacation spot? Where?

Salmon Point, Prince Edward County. The entire county is paradise.

10.Can you tell us about one of your favourite childhood memories?

One memory has influenced my writing more than the others. I grew up in all-white neighbourhood, school and town. In my early years, I never met anyone who didn’t resemble my family, neighbours or friends. My mother, a nurse, didn’t drive much, especially on blustery winter days, so she found herself taking the bus to work at the hospital in a town thirty minutes away. When she came home that night, she had a stranger with her, an African American woman. Apparently, the bus driver had given the woman a hard time because of the colour of her skin and had refused to let her off at her bus stop, which would have forced her to back track several miles in a blizzard, and in the dark, to get home. Outraged, my mother had blasted the driver—she wasn’t one to hold back—and had brought the woman to our house to have dinner, then my father drove her home. As a child, I didn’t understand the driver’s perspective. It made me feel sick. It didn’t make sense—and it still doesn’t!

11.If you aren’t writing (or doing anything associated with writing), what are you doing?

Reading. Walking. Listening to music. Biking. Hanging out with family and friends. Watching a movie.

12.Have you ever met anyone famous – who?

I met Pierre Elliot Trudeau when he was prime minister. I was a reporter covering a local Liberal candidate’s fundraising picnic when the prime minister’s helicopter landed in a farmer’s field nearby. I remember every detail of the day. The prime minister seemed much smaller than I had imagined—for in the papers his presence was large—and he had his signature rose in his lapel and wore a navy pinstriped suit. As reporters tend to do, they rushed up to him asking questions and demanding to be heard. I tended to stay back when the others moved forward, for I didn’t like getting up into someone’s face. As a reporter, my shyness often got in my way. But that day, it worked in my favour. Trudeau walked past the others towards me and asked if I had any questions for him. He was charming and friendly, and I was dumbfounded!

About the Book: Moonshadow

Lauren Prescott’s family secrets were buried long before she was born, during the sixties era when her great-grandparents took in a runaway girl from an Indian residential school. Her ailing grandfather, who was a teenager back then, now longs to find the girl—Rose Hill—to right a wrong before he dies. He’s ashamed of how he treated her because he recoiled from the racist climate of colonialism of the time. Haunted by the past, Lauren risks everything to go after the truth for her grandfather—even her life!

Bio

JOY LYNN GODDARD is one of Canada’s top novelists in the young adult genre. Drawing from her experiences as a teacher, she has written a picture book, a middle-grade novel and five coming-of-age novels, beginning with the award-winning Daredevils. A former journalist, she has had copious articles and short stories published and more recently teamed up with her husband Dan to write an adult anthology, which is a parody on the real estate industry. Moonshadow is her latest collaboration with Dan. They divide their time between Guelph and Prince Edward County, Ontario, where she teaches and writes, he’s in sales and volunteer work, and they spend time with family. Learn more about her by visiting www.joygoddard.com.

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Book Review – Reckless Emotions

Reckless Emotions

Reckless Emotions by R L Smith

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Eighteen-year-old Macy Chandler has lots of plans, one of which is attending college in the fall and continuing her 3-year relationship with Brian. But that all changes when Brian breaks up with her after accepting a scholarship at a college in another state. And to make matters worse, he is leaving for Italy for the summer. Macy is heartbroken. To help take her mind off of her problems, she gets a summer job working as a waitress at high end restaurant. Macy meets Dillon, a young man with a rough past. She can’t help be intrigued by him and if it helps to keep her mind off Brian, a new relationship might be what she needs. Unfortunately, Dillon is not what she expected. And by the time she realizes he has been lying to her, it’s too late. Macy is in trouble, but who will save her now?

Reckless Emotion is a fast-paced story and easy read. It is well-written with few grammatical errors. It’s a great read for any young adult.

While the story held my attention, I did find Macy’s character to be a little bit unbelievable as she was almost too naive. It’s not until near the end of the book that she finally realizes she actually needs to do something if she wants to save her life, despite having plenty of opportunities earlier on.

This YA novel is perfect for a quick and easy read that is sure to make you turn the pages.



View all my reviews

Book Review – The Darkest Eyes

The Darkest Eyes

The Darkest Eyes by Mick Brady

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Haunted by little grey men for most of her life, Will Roan sees them not only in her dreams but even when she seems wide awake. Will has always felt a little different and she just can’t seem to “find herself” no matter what she does or tries. She is even unlucky in love, never able to find one, and she can’t hang on to friendships or make connections. But when she travels through a portal to another world, her life suddenly has meaning, and she learns why those little grey men have been hunting her.

The Darkest Eyes is Mick Brady’s debut novel and for a first book, it is well done. I enjoyed reading this novel and the story kept me intrigued. There were places in the book where I could feel the anxiety of the characters and the descriptions made it easy to visualize. The story is well-written with few errors either grammatically or technically.

This is a fairly lengthy book compared to most these days with just over 600 pages. If I have to be critical about anything, perhaps some paring down. Though I can’t recall thinking at any time that anything was unnecessary.

If you like adventure, sci-fi, fantasy, with a little touch of romance, this is a book you’ll want to read.




View all my reviews

Author Interview – Julia Sutton

Author Julia Sutton is my interview guest this week.

Julia has published three novels and is finishing up book 4 of her School of Dreams series.

Thank you, Julia, for participating in my interview this week.

About Writing/Books/Being an Author

1. Do you remember the first book you read that had an impact on you – in what way and what was the name of that book?

Firstly, hello and thank you for interviewing me Sandra 😊

When I was a young girl, I loved Enid Blyton books (The Magic Faraway Tree) and Roald Dahl (James and the giant peach). They inspired me as a young girl to want to become an author. I loved escaping into fictitious worlds and this has always stayed with me.

Stephen King is a brilliant writer – Salem’s Lot is my favourite of his novels. I remember reading that as a teenager and being seriously impressed by his talent and also scared to death lol.

I’m currently reading all sorts of genres. Reading is my favourite hobby and I’ll give anything a go: romance, psychological thrillers, horror and most recently I’ve read my very first sci-fi novel by fellow Creativia author Phil Price.

2. When did you first realize you wanted to write?

I think it was probably when I was around 7. I used to write stories and poems even way back then and loved English at school. As a teenager I aspired to be a journalist or anything to do with writing. My life took a different route however and I was so busy with work and family that I didn’t have time to write. It wasn’t until I was in my 40s that I had my first novel published. Now I have more time to spend writing and have three published novels currently available via online stores such as Amazon and have almost finished my fourth book.

3. Who is/are your favourite author(s)?

So many, but these are a few that I’ve read multiple works of and really enjoyed: Carole Matthews, Milly Johnson, Jill Mansell, Lucy Diamond, Stephen King, Phil Price, Audrina Lane, Michelle Diana Lowe.

4. What is your favourite thing about writing? What is your least favourite thing?

I love producing a book from a tiny idea and creating diverse and interesting characters. Seeing my book in print is so exciting and fulfilling. The marketing aspect can be time consuming but enjoyable; I like connecting with others on social media and talking about my writing with the general public.

I don’t really have a least favourite, as I enjoy the complete writing process, but I do find blurbs challenging to write and also proofreading / editing can be draining.

5. Where do your ideas come from?

Mainly from my over-active imagination, but also from conversations, travelling too different places, news articles etc.

6. I’ve often found that creative people have more than one talent, what is yours?

I love drawing and would love to have a go at pottery and jewellery making. I’m also in the process of completing a proofreading course with the ambition to work with other writers in the future.

7. If you could jump inside of a book for one day (as an observer) what book would it be?

Probably the New Testament of the Holy Bible, as I want to know if Jesus really existed.

8. When you create characters, are they completely made up or do they resemble or remind you of people you know?

A mixture of both. Sometimes people I know or have fleetingly met do inspire me and other times the characters are completely made up. I recently had an idea for a holiday book whilst on holiday myself and the main character is inspired by one of my neighbours.

9. Have you ever created a character “out of thin air” only to run into someone in real life that reminds you of that character either in personality or their features?

No that one’s never happened to me – yet LOL!

10. How do you come up with titles for your books?

Usually an idea pops into my head as I’m writing a plan but if I’m struggling, I write a list of words associated with the book’s themes and play around with them until I come up with a suitable title.

11. What are you working on now and can you tell us about it?

I’m currently working on the fourth and final book in the School of Dreams series. It’s called The Year of New Beginnings; I’ve written 75,000 words and almost finished. I also have a few ideas for new books: a Christmas book and a holiday romance book, which I intend to start after the School of Dreams is completed.

I’ve also written a few children’s stories which I have been sending off to agents in the hope that one day, they too will be published as books 😊

12. Have you won any awards for your writing/books and if so what?

No, I haven’t won any awards for my writing, but being a published author is reward enough for me.

A Little More Personal

13. What is one thing you haven’t done but would like to do?

Professionally I would love to have my children’s books published and to see my adult fiction on the shelves of physical book stores. Personally, I would love to go on a whale watching trip.

14. Do you have a favourite vacation spot? Where?

I love the island of Majorca and have holidayed there four times now. The beaches are beautiful, the sea is amazing and the people are super friendly.

15. Can you tell us about one of your favourite childhood memories?

Performing in the school play is one of my favourite childhood memories – I wanted to be the princess but was cast as a tom boy and in fact it was a great part to play – so much fun and more challenging.

16. What makes you happy?

Being with my family and friends makes me happy. Writing, drawing, reading, exercising, eating nice food and sleeping also make me happy.

17. If you aren’t writing (or doing anything associated with writing), what are you doing?

Housework, listening to music, drawing, exercising, watching T.V.

18. Have you ever met anyone famous – who?

I’ve met the Pet Shop Boys way back in the 1980s and have their autographs somewhere in my bedside drawer.


Julia’s Links
Facebook Author Page:- https://www.facebook.com/booksbyjulia1972

Twitter:- Julia Sutton Books @booksbyjulia72

Instagram:- Julia Sutton Books

Author Interview – Kathryn Rossati

sdr

My guest this week is fantasy author, Kathryn Rossati. Kathryn writes YA/NA and childrens’ fiction as well as poetry. She also has published works under the pen name of Kathryn Wells.

Thank you, Kathryn, for participating in author interviews.

About Writing/Books/Being an Author

1. Do you remember the first book you read that had an impact on you – in what way and what was the name of that book?

Not specifically, as I read voraciously as a kid and so absorbed quite a few books. There was one series that made me want to write a sequel, though – which I guess would be fan fic now – and that was The Legendeer by Alan Gibbons, about a boy who goes into a game world as Perseus. It taught me a lot about Greek, Norse and Vampire myths.

2. When did you first realize you wanted to write?

I think I started writing stories as soon as I grasped enough writing skills to do so at around five or six, and a few years after that, I knew it was what I wanted to do when I grew up.

3. Who is/are your favourite author(s)?

Tough one, as I have so many: Diana Wynne Jones, David Eddings, Garth Nix, Geanna Culberston, Jonathan Stroud, Cornelia Funke

4. What is your favourite thing about writing? What is your least favourite thing about writing?

My favourite is coming up with ideas. I tend to get lost in my head for days doing this. My least favourite is definitely the first draft, as there are times when the words simply don’t flow as well as they should. Saying that, I make them come out when I have deadlines.

5. Where do your ideas come from?

I’d say from everything I absorb going through life – any interactions, art, media, dreams. All sorts of places, really. I take bits from here and there and jumble them all up in a pot and let them stew together.

6. I’ve often found that creative people have more than one talent, what is yours?

Hmm, I don’t know about talent, but there’s lots of things I’m interested in. I’m quite good at arts and crafts when I want to be.

7. If you could jump inside a book for one day (as an observer) what book would it be?

One of Garth Nix’s Abhorsen ones, I’d love to see Charter Magic for real.


8. When you create characters, are they completely made up or do they resemble or remind you of people you know?

That often depends on the book. Sometimes there’s intentionally parts from people I know in them, others there’s not.

9. Have you ever created a character “out of thin air” only to run into someone in real life that reminds you of that character either in personality or their features?

No, actually. But I’m quite glad, as I’d probably end up calling them by the character name, which would lead to all sorts of confusion.

10. How do you come up with titles for your books?

Sometimes they’re inspired by the plot or something a character says, though I often have the title in my head before I start writing. Of course, they can change as I get more familiar with my characters.

11. What are you working on now and can you tell us about it?

I’m writing a middle grade time travel about a girl who ends up in the Victorian era and meeting a boy magician whose journal she found in an old magic book.

12. Have you won any awards for your writing/books and if so what?

I’ve come runner-up in a few local short story competitions before. None of my books have been entered into competitions, but maybe someday they will be, so who knows?

A Little More Personal

13. What is one thing you haven’t done but would like to do?

I’d love to own my own bookshop one day.

14. Can you tell us about an embarrassing/funny moment?

I have many. Being autistic, I often misunderstand what people are saying, only to figure it out a while after. Those moments can be either hilarious or embarrassing, depending on who I’m with. If I’m with my other half, we usually end up roaring with laughter and going completely off topic.

15. Have you ever experienced something weird you could not explain?

Not that I can think of. My mum has though.

16. Are you superstitious? Do you have any rituals for good luck?

I try not to be, though I often have my mum’s old rhymes pop into my head (like when seeing magpies). I don’t have any rituals for luck, but I do have some for comfort. I’m a very routine person though, so I guess that explains it.

17. What is the strangest thing you have ever eaten?

I’ve been known to dip lollipops into tea before. And I tend to throw any old thing together when I’m low on ingredients.

18. Do you have a favourite vacation spot? Where?

I like quiet places around nature. But on the flip side, I’ve always wanted to go back to Disneyland.

19. Can you tell us about one of your favourite childhood memories?

I’ve got quite a few, but I loved going to museums. I also had one of my stories read out in front of the whole school in primary, which was lovely, but kind of embarrassing too.

20. What makes you happy?

Rambles off the beaten track with my other half (neither of us have any sense of direction, so it’s usually an adventure), reading, being creative, spending time with my animals.

21. If you aren’t writing (or doing anything associated with writing), what are you doing?

Procrastinating, usually. Which can mean anything from cleaning the whole house or getting stuck into The Legend of Zelda/ a good book.

22. Have you ever met anyone famous – who?

Nope, but I’d love to meet some of my favourite authors.

Kate’s Links:

Blog: krobats.wordpress.com

Website: www.kathrynrossati.co.uk

Twitter: @KaptainKat90

AllAuthor: https://allauthor.com/author/kathrynrossati/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dragonink90/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authorKathrynRossati/

Discover new worlds – KaLiCon style – intro

I can’t wait to read these ‘chats’.

SEELKs fire & ice

Hello and welcome!

As I make the final preparations for my trip to RTC in a few days, my thoughts turn to KaLiCon in October. I will be returning, as ‘bossy’ PA to Mary Ann (M. A. Abraham) I look forward to it, planning a few surprises for the Elven Games v2.0 😉

girlWbinoculars.jpg

source

Andi Lawrencovna came up with this great idea and a few of the authors signing at KaLiCon 2019 joined her to make anthology, where each share a short story, giving the readers a chance to get to know their writing styles and the worlds they created. It will release August 1 and will be available FREE until the event starts. How awesome is that?

I invited their heroes, heroines for a chat and starting August 1, 2019 I will have them posted here for you to enjoy, one each day, give you a little…

View original post 31 more words

Author Interview – Simone Beaudelaire

Welcome, Author Simone Beaudelaire, and thank you for being my guest this week.

I hope you enjoy getting to know a little about Simone and check our her newest release, Where the Wind Blows, on Amazon.

About Writing/Books/Being an Author

1. Do you remember the first book you read that had an impact on you – in what way and what was the name of that book?

One of the early books that had an impact on me was Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. I remember so much about it. The vivid details. The charismatic characters. Most of all that the author didn’t shy away from authentic emotion. It’s an ugly cry book—probably my first—and the impact of those undiluted emotions never left me.

2. When did you first realize you wanted to write?

Always, I think. I was making up stories at a very young age. I used to take all my Cabbage Patch dolls and Pound Puppies (and the cat when he would cooperate) onto my bed and pretend we were lost at sea, fleeing an oppressive regime, or going into space. All kinds of scenarios. My stories developed plots and characters in middle school, when I retreated into my imagination to escape bullies. I wrote my first ‘book’ at the age of 14, but it was so bad, I threw it away. I didn’t try again until my undergraduate days, when I started a historical romance… and then left it, and the second book I started (a contemporary military romance) half-finished and moldering, for a decade until I learned to complete books. Now, those two books are done and published, and many of the characters I invented in middle school are around in print as well.

3. Who is/are your favourite author(s)?

A tough question. Okay. I like classic literature, so Shakespeare, Robert Browning, John Donne and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow are favorites. I like Poe and Hawthorne as well. On the other hand, I love romance novels. Mary Jo Putney taught me a lot about emotion in romances, how to have a great plot, and how to bring description to life. I also like Lisa Kleypas for her unapologetic heat level.

4. What is your favourite thing about writing? What is your least favourite thing about writing?

I love the creative process, especially that part just past the halfway point when the book takes over and writing it is no longer an act of will. I can’t sleep when I’m in the zone, but it’s a high no drug could match. I dislike marketing. I’m not a businessperson. So, I’m happy to make the art and let someone else sell it.

5. Where do your ideas come from?

From angst. From what hurts me. From unfulfilled wishes and dying dreams. If they can’t live in my reality, by God they can live on paper.

6. I’ve often found that creative people have more than one talent, what is yours?

I enjoy singing, though I’m not sure I’d call myself a musician. I guess my other talent is teaching. My students seem to like me well enough. I also have a hobby of cooking and baking.

7. If you could jump inside a book for one day (as an observer) what book would it be?

Hard to say. I would love to be a fly on the proverbial wall overlooking the Battle of Waterloo in Shattered Rainbows by Mary Jo Putney. I’d love to be a guest at Othello and Desdemona’s wedding. I’d love to attend the Romany feasts depicted in both Thunder and Roses by Mary Jo Putney and several of Lisa Kleypas’s novels. I’d also love to step into my books and apologize to my characters for my lack of skill when I created them.

8. When you create characters, are they completely made up or do they resemble or remind you of people you know?

Some of both. A number of bullies and jerks who play antagonists resemble my abusive ex-husband. I create characters as a composite of people I know. But they are also parts of my character most people never get to see. They also have imaginary experiences that color their personas, so I guess each well-developed character is bits of this and that.

9. Have you ever created a character “out of thin air” only to run into someone in real life that reminds you of that character either in personality or their features?

As a matter of fact, yes. I wrote the same hero several times, with different faces, background stories, etc. A kind, loving, supportive man who truly knows how to listen. Then I met my now husband and realized who I had been calling out to all that time…

10. How do you come up with titles for your books?

I agonize over them and then something will randomly come to me.

11. What are you working on now and can you tell us about it?

I’m working on a revamp of that first novel I mentioned earlier, a historical romance called Beautiful Rose. It needs some polishing up. Also, a sequel to my short story collection Amor Maldito. This time, I’m focusing on American folklore. Book 1 was about Tex-Mex or Tejano folklore.

12. Have you won any awards for your writing/books and if so what?

I haven’t entered any competitions. I don’t want to see writing as a race to the top, but rather a playground where everyone gets a turn on the slide. I’m not trying to prove anything to anyone, only to share what I’ve created with those who care. Readers abound. I’m not going to scramble after them

A Little More Personal

13. What is one thing you haven’t done but would like to do?

Earn a doctorate, maybe. I’m still thinking about this.

14. Can you tell us about an embarrassing/funny moment?

I’d rather not, if it’s all the same.

15. Have you ever experienced something weird you could not explain?

Yes. Several times, but most recently I had this happen. My husband and I went to New Orleans for a delayed honeymoon. We’d been married a short time and I was pregnant with our now two-year-old baby. We went on a ghost tour (a New Orleans tradition for our family). In that tour, we stopped outside the Pharmacy Museum and the tour guide told us that pregnant women should not touch or enter the building. I wasn’t showing yet, so there’s no way she could have known. She told us that the former pharmacist used to do experiments on enslaved women and caused their babies to have birth defects. The ghost once trapped a pregnant employee inside the building.

The next day, at sunset, my husband and I walked past the building and stopped at the farthest point of the sidewalk. He embraced me from behind and we chatted for a moment about how creepy the building was. Then, SOMETHING touched my hair. It wasn’t my husband, as his hands were on my tummy. He didn’t see anything, and he was completely plastered to my back. So, what was it? I think the ghost of the pharmacist popped out to let me know he’d noticed me.

16. Are you superstitious? Do you have any rituals for good luck?

I am. But I don’t have any luck, so I rely on work instead.

17. What is the strangest thing you have ever eaten?

Frogs and snails. Not bad.

18. Do you have a favourite vacation spot? Where?

New Orleans, as mentioned above. I love Brittany, France, but with a family of six, the cost is prohibitive.

19. Can you tell us about one of your favourite childhood memories?

I didn’t have the happiest childhood. My best memories are of reading in my room.

20. What makes you happy?

Walking with my husband, talking about random things. Watching movies with my kids. Cuddling the baby. Ordinary things.

21. If you aren’t writing (or doing anything associated with writing), what are you doing?

Teaching, keeping house, having intense talks with my husband and kids.

22. Have you ever met anyone famous – who?

Nope. I rang up Bobby Pulido when I was cashiering at Walmart in college, but I didn’t know who he was. I did go to high school with Selena’s cousin, but that’s as close as it gets.

Simone’s Links

Website: https://www.simonebeaudelaire.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Simone-Beaudelaire-and-Edwin-Stark-703991259648857

Amazon: http://author.to/SBAmazon